Alyssa Mazzina

Alyssa Mazzina
Alyssa is a Content Writer at Stack Overflow where she writes for the Code for a Living blog, helping developers make the most of their careers. She lives in California, in a house filled with kids and dogs.
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Recent Posts

What it Means to be a Remote-First Company

At Stack Overflow, we often talk about why we believe in remote work, and we’ve been extremely successful with our results. In fact, our 2016 company engagement survey revealed that 88% of remote workers felt high overall engagement with the company (as compared to an overall response of 85% among the whole company, with the average being 71% among employees at other companies in our industry). Remote workers also rated “work life blend” and “social connection” more highly than employees as a whole.

How to Get a Job You're Overqualified For

If you’re a veteran developer looking for a new role, you’ve probably bypassed plenty of postings because you felt you were too experienced. Sometimes that’s valid—you have no desire to go backwards in your career.

How to Rock a Side Project When You Have No Free Time

We’ve all heard the advice: the best developers live and breathe programming. But you’re also a human being. Maybe you’re not the stereotypical 22-year-old with no ties or responsibilities, happy to work 18-hour days. Maybe you’re a mother or a father, a husband or a wife, a caretaker of an elderly relative.

There are millions of developers in the world, and they come in every shape. Most of us are not in our early 20s, many of us aren’t single, and few of us want to give our entire lives to our jobs. So how do we reconcile that truth with the general belief that the “best” developers are those who eat, sleep, and breathe code?

In other words, how can you show you’re passionate and committed without completely neglecting the rest of your life and responsibilities? Specifically, how can you find the time for personal projects without losing your mind?

Take the 2017 Stack Overflow Developer Survey

We've just released the 2017 edition of the Stack Overflow Developer Survey, the largest and most comprehensive survey of software developers on earth. As a company our sole mission is making the lives of developers better, and we can’t do that without hearing from you. Take the survey now.

Pair Programming and How It Can Make You a Better Programmer

Pair programming, where two developers share a single workstation, has grown more common and less controversial over the years, but many still haven’t tried it themselves. In pair programming one participant is the “driver,” who actually writes code, and the other is the “navigator,” who checks the driver’s work as it’s done and keeps an eye on the big picture. The two switch roles every few minutes, and talk to each other throughout the process.

Why Developers Should Always Be in Job-Seeking Mode

The ideal job-hunting situation is simple: You have a job, your bills are being paid, you’re comfortable, but you’re looking for a step up or a new challenge. You quietly apply for jobs while continuing to excel in your current role, find one that represents a comfortable advancement in your career, give your two-weeks notice, and move on.

How To Find a Remote Job You Won't Regret Taking

When you’re a developer looking for remote work, the last thing you want is to land on what seems like a dream job only to find you’re the lonely island of the company. Sure, they have some Slack channels where, ostensibly, you’re part of the team. You can hang out in them and hear about who’s going out to lunch together, when somebody brings in donuts, how great that happy hour was last night, or that hilarious thing Jim did by the watercooler this morning. The only thing you can’t do is join the conversation.

How I Open Sourced My Way to My Dream Job: Mohamed Said

Mohamed Said got his first computer at age 13—they were just becoming commonly accessible in Egypt—and started learning to code almost immediately. Flash was what drew him in, he says, with its animations and color and, well, “flashy” stuff.

Developers: Trash Your Resumes

Last week we wrote about whether a college degree is a necessity for a developer in today’s market. We came to the conclusion that what you can do is more important than how many framed diplomas you can hang on the wall, and the most important thing you can to do make yourself hireable as a developer is to code, early and often.

Do Developers Need College Degrees?

Do developers need college degrees? Just a generation ago, it was a given that a college degree was the best way to maximize the likelihood of securing a high-paying job in the field of your choice. But the world has changed, and more and more you hear of successful developers who never earned a degree, or college dropouts who made it big in Silicon Valley. Think pieces are published every day pondering the value of college, the skyrocketing rate of student loan debt, and whether or not the entire institution is just outdated and archaic.